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Cue the Ron Paul “It’s Happening” gif and shout it from the rooftops: DEA will reschedule marijuana from Schedule I to Schedule III of the Controlled Substances Act, per a report from the AP. The United States federal government, through two federal agencies, is officially recognizing that cannabis “has a currently accepted medical use in treatment” and has a “potential for abuse less than drugs or other substances in Schedules I and II.”

All signs pointed towards this result, though most didn’t want to believe it until an announcement. Known repercussions will be massive, but many, many unknowns exist. And the process towards official rescheduling and federal regulation could be arduous. The White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) will now review the DEA’s rescheduling proposal, and once approved, a period for public comment will commence. Then the DEA will publish the final rule. Questions abound about exactly what the final rule will look like and how a new federal regulatory regime over marijuana will impact the plethora of state programs, old and new alike, currently operating.

Stay tuned over the next several weeks as we dive into the particulars of the administrative process that lies ahead and explore some of the ways this monumental shift in U.S. drug policy will (or may) affect the current multibillion-dollar U.S. cannabis industry.

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Photo of Slates C. Veazey Slates C. Veazey

Slates is a member of Bradley’s Cannabis Industry team, advising clients on a variety of cannabis issues and in a wide range of sectors. From individuals and entities interested in participating in the new Mississippi medical cannabis program to non-plant-touching companies impacted by…

Slates is a member of Bradley’s Cannabis Industry team, advising clients on a variety of cannabis issues and in a wide range of sectors. From individuals and entities interested in participating in the new Mississippi medical cannabis program to non-plant-touching companies impacted by that emerging market, Slates and his partners provide the full suite of services that Bradley offers to its many other clients — but with a specific understanding of the ever-changing cannabis industry. His work has been featured in The National Law Journal, JD Supra, and the Cannabis Business Executive. Slates also has been quoted by the Mississippi Business Journal and Mississippi Today regarding Mississippi’s medical cannabis program.

Photo of Whitt Steineker Whitt Steineker

As co-chair of Bradley’s Cannabis Industry team, Whitt represents clients in a wide range of cannabis issues. In addition to providing a full suite of legal services to cannabis companies, Whitt and the Cannabis Industry team advise non-cannabis clients – from banks to…

As co-chair of Bradley’s Cannabis Industry team, Whitt represents clients in a wide range of cannabis issues. In addition to providing a full suite of legal services to cannabis companies, Whitt and the Cannabis Industry team advise non-cannabis clients – from banks to commercial real estate companies to insurance companies and high net worth individuals – on best practices for interacting with cannabis companies.

Whitt is one of the leading voices in the cannabis bar – recognized as a “Go-To Thought Leader” by the National Law Review. He has presented on cannabis issues at conferences around the country.  His work has been featured in the National Law JournalLaw360, and the Westlaw Journal. And he has been quoted in an array of legal and mainstream publications from Law360 and Super Lawyers to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Associated Press.

Photo of J. Hunter Robinson J. Hunter Robinson

Hunter Robinson represents clients in commercial litigation and compliance matters across the country. His cannabis practice focuses on solving problems for cannabis companies and their vendors. Hunter has worked alongside other members of Bradley’s Cannabis Industry team to help hemp and medical cannabis…

Hunter Robinson represents clients in commercial litigation and compliance matters across the country. His cannabis practice focuses on solving problems for cannabis companies and their vendors. Hunter has worked alongside other members of Bradley’s Cannabis Industry team to help hemp and medical cannabis companies obtain licenses, structure business entities, raise capital, negotiate contracts with suppliers and distributors, and maintain compliance with the ever-shifting state and federal laws that govern their operations. Hunter also advises financial institutions regarding the complex laws governing the provision of financial services to cannabis companies, including the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) and related Anti-Money Laundering (AML) statutes and regulations.